How much you’ll swell really depends on you and on your surgeon’s technique—not so much the type of rhinoplasty you had. Dr. William Portuese, a facial plastic surgeon in Seattle, says that “The amount of swelling after a rhinoplasty procedure depends upon the type of rhinoplasty performed [open versus closed], the thickness of the skin, the amount of alteration required to the nasal tip, and the patient’s variability with the healing process itself.” He notes that “Some patients require taping and steroid shots in the tip of the nose to reduce swelling in that area for the first several months after the procedure.” According to Dr. Miller, “A very clean open rhinoplasty can result in minimal swelling, while with a closed procedure that isn’t performed in the ideal tissue and cartilage, you can have a lot more swelling. If the dissection travels through soft tissue or muscle on top of the cartilage, more bleeding and swelling will develop.” He notes that most people can also expect some bleeding from days two to five, but it should lessen with each passing day.

Case 72: This patient had sustained a nasal fracture that caused a significant deviation of her nose. The fracture was corrected along with a septoplasty to improve breathing. Loss of tip support after the injury made her hump look more prominent and her tip felt more droopy. The bump was smoothened and her tip angulation restored to create the softer, more feminine profile she wanted. At the same time, fat transfer to the cheek and under eye area and subtle neck liposuction substantially improved the flat cheek and mid-face contour that previously made her feel hollowed and tired looking without makeup.


If you’re having what’s called an open rhinoplasty, the surgeon will make an incision (about 6 millimeters long) in the skin between the nostrils. “Open rhinoplasty is a very common technique, where the skin is lifted upward like the hood on a car,” says Dr. Ronald Schuster, a Baltimore plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A about open vs. closed rhinoplasties. If you’re having a closed rhinoplasty, all incisions are placed on the inside of the nose, so there are no external scars.
Case 26: Narrowing a wide tip can really soften the face. The challenge in Ethnic rhinoplasty is in making a nose smaller while still maintaining good structure and support so that definition is enhanced. In these 15-month photos, you can now see how tip narrowing along with reduction of the bridge convexity has created a very pretty, feminine nose that enhances her beauty.

Case 46: A hump and hanging tip cause the nose to dominate otherwise beautiful features in this young woman. In this case, a tip lift, hump reduction, and tip refinement preserves some of her rounded appearance, very naturally enhancing her pretty eyes. On the bottom view, we see a good example of how open rhinoplasty incisions should heal virtually undetectably when done with care.


The FDA approved such usage in the late1980s when it was discovered that Botox could stop ailments such as uncontrolled blinking and lazy eye. Cosmetic physicians have been using Botox for years to treat wrinkles and facial creases. Botox is an approved treatment for frown lines on the forehead, crow’s feet (lines around the eye), and axillary hyperhidrosis (increased sweating of the armpits).
If you don't know what nasal packing is, consider yourself lucky. Nasal packing is gauze placed deep inside the nose, usually to prevent or stop bleeding. Dr Rival uses nasal packing in only about 5% of all his rhinoplasty surgeries. Sometimes in very deviated noses he may place plastic splints inside the nose to maintain a straight septum for 5 to 7 days.
Before anything else, the surgeon determines a patient's candidacy for rhinoplasty. He or she takes the patient's health history, asks about medications and whether the patient smokes, and addresses other concerns. It is important for the patient to be honest with the doctor. Withholding certain information could increase the risk of surgical complications.
After surgery, patients should be prepared for the cost of any pain medication they will take during recovery. These costs are not typically included in the overall cost of surgery. At my practice, we provide homeopathic medications as part of our total surgical package. Your surgeon can explain to you any prescription or homeopathic medications you may be prescribed and discuss their cost.
Like facelift surgery, brow lift surgery eliminates sagging skin and reduces deep creases. However, brow lifts specifically target the forehead and the area between the eyebrows. The doctor creates an incision along the hairline or the crown of the head. Then he or she lifts the underlying muscles to reduce frown lines, vertical creases, sagging eyebrows, and hooded brows.
Case 46: A hump and hanging tip cause the nose to dominate otherwise beautiful features in this young woman. In this case, a tip lift, hump reduction, and tip refinement preserves some of her rounded appearance, very naturally enhancing her pretty eyes. On the bottom view, we see a good example of how open rhinoplasty incisions should heal virtually undetectably when done with care.
On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”
If there is not a clear title, name of the clinic or a doctor's name stated as an author, it is likely that the information was not provided by the medical specialist. Content of Estheticon.com reviews and discussion forums is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any disease and cannot replace medical consultation with a qualified health professional or substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 
Rhinoplasty is one of the most popular cosmetic surgeries among teenagers. It is important for teenage patients and their surgeons to consider whether or not nose reshaping is an appropriate cosmetic surgery option. Doctors should ensure that the decision to undergo rhinoplasty is the patient's own choice, rather than the result of peer or parental pressure. Regardless of the reason for surgery, doctors recommend that girls wait until age 14 or 15, and that boys wait a few additional years to undergo rhinoplasty. By this time, the nose should have finished growing.
Recovery from rhinoplasty can take several weeks, and patients should prepare accordingly. In particular, they should take at least two weeks off of work and arrange for a ride home from the hospital or surgical center. If possible, they should find someone who can stay with them for a few days to help with daily tasks. After rhinoplasty, chewing can be uncomfortable, so patients should buy plenty of soft foods to eat during the first several days.

However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 

Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners.
Case 69: This patient was bothered by his prominent ears and a sense of width to his nose that made it feel bulky and unrefined in his view. While still preserving his ethnic identity, he was able to achieve a meaningful improvement in nasal balance. Bringing his ears back into the vertical plane helped to make them less noticeable and remove them as a source of focus for him.
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