After the patient is sedated, the surgeon creates tiny incisions inside the nostrils or on the columella. Then he or she carefully lifts the skin to access the underlying bone and cartilage. The surgeon can then remove or graft tissues, as needed. Typically, a doctor uses conservative methods to minimize the impact to the surrounding tissues while still achieving the desired results. When the reshaping process is complete, the doctor lays the skin back down over the new contours of the nose and closes the incisions.

Once your bone and cartilage have been resculpted, your surgeon pulls the skin back down and stitches it along the open-rhinoplasty incision across the columella (the tissue that links the nasal tip to the nasal base). “When done properly, that incision is extremely hard to see, once it’s healed,” says Dr. Miller. With a closed procedure, the incisions are made inside your nostrils, so there’s no visible scarring, and the sutures are usually dissolvable. 
Case 34: Hispanic Rhinoplasty in this patient meant removal of a high dorsal bump on profile and correction of a droopy-appearing tip. On front view, there is correction of a left nasal bone fracture and refinement of the nasal tip. All of this was done while still maintaining her unique individuality and while bearing in mind the various challenges Rhinoplasty in Latino patients present- thicker skin and softer cartilage.
Rhinoplasty is a highly personal procedure that can affect a person's mental well-being, as well as his or her appearance. Therefore, it is vital that patients choose a surgeon with whom they feel comfortable. They should select a doctor who truly listens to their concerns, answers their questions, and creates a treatment plan that will address their specific goals. Patients should never choose someone who makes unrealistic promises or pressures them to undergo more surgery than they actually want.
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