Your plastic surgeon's experience and reputation make the greatest difference in the cost of rhinoplasty. Here in Manhattan, it is possible to undergo the procedure for as little as $3,000 when it is performed by surgeons-in-training, supervised by senior surgeons. Meanwhile, there are experienced surgeons who are not performing as many rhinoplasties as they would like, and may be willing to perform the procedure for $5,000 to $7,000. However, if rhinoplasty is your surgeon's specialty, this can provide the best chances of achieving the results you desire. His or her fees will reflect that, and depending on where the practice is located, the total cost of surgery can be upwards of $15,000. 

Secondary rhinoplasty differs from the primary procedure in that it may require cartilage or bone grafting. If too much tissue or bone was removed in the first surgery, the doctor will need to replace this in order to achieve the desired look. Often, cartilage is taken from the ear or other areas of the nose. In rare cases, it is harvested from a rib, in what is known as a costal cartilage graft.

Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.


For me, the main area of concern is my forehead, which I’m told by all the greatest in injectables, to be the most common for those under thirty. After too many holiday sunburns, and recognising that I speak with very expressive eyebrows, the fine faint lines horizontally across my forehead have become much more prominent. So, in the name of beauty journalism I decided to give botox a try, here's what I learnt...

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